Detail publikace

Optimization of cementitious composite for heavyweight concrete preparation using conduction calorimetry

Originální název

Optimization of cementitious composite for heavyweight concrete preparation using conduction calorimetry

Anglický název

Optimization of cementitious composite for heavyweight concrete preparation using conduction calorimetry

Jazyk

en

Originální abstrakt

The present work investigates the hydration heat of different cement composites by means of conduction calorimetry to optimize the composition of binder in the design of heavyweight concrete as biological shielding. For this purpose, Portland cement CEM I 42.5 R was replaced by a different portion of supplementary cementitious materials (blast furnace slag, metakaolin, silica fume/limestone) at 75%, 65%, 60%, 55%, and 50% levels to obtain low hydration heat lower than 250 j g(-1). All ingredients were analyzed by energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) and nuclear activation analysis (NAA) to assess the content of major elements and isotopes. A mixture of two high-density aggregates (barite and magnetite) was used to prepare three heavyweights concretes with compressive strength exceeding 45 MPa and bulk density ranging between 3400 and 3500 kg m(-3). After a short period of volume expansion (up to 4 h), a slight shrinkage (max. 0.3 degrees/degrees degrees) has been observed. Also, thermophysical properties (thermal conductivity, volumetric specific heat, thermal diffusivity) and other properties were determined. The results showed that aggregate content and not binder is the main factor influencing the engineering properties of heavyweight concretes.

Anglický abstrakt

The present work investigates the hydration heat of different cement composites by means of conduction calorimetry to optimize the composition of binder in the design of heavyweight concrete as biological shielding. For this purpose, Portland cement CEM I 42.5 R was replaced by a different portion of supplementary cementitious materials (blast furnace slag, metakaolin, silica fume/limestone) at 75%, 65%, 60%, 55%, and 50% levels to obtain low hydration heat lower than 250 j g(-1). All ingredients were analyzed by energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) and nuclear activation analysis (NAA) to assess the content of major elements and isotopes. A mixture of two high-density aggregates (barite and magnetite) was used to prepare three heavyweights concretes with compressive strength exceeding 45 MPa and bulk density ranging between 3400 and 3500 kg m(-3). After a short period of volume expansion (up to 4 h), a slight shrinkage (max. 0.3 degrees/degrees degrees) has been observed. Also, thermophysical properties (thermal conductivity, volumetric specific heat, thermal diffusivity) and other properties were determined. The results showed that aggregate content and not binder is the main factor influencing the engineering properties of heavyweight concretes.

BibTex


@article{BUT165064,
  author="Janette {Dragomirová} and Martin {Palou} and Eva {Kuzielova} and Matúš {Žemlička} and Radoslav {Novotný}",
  title="Optimization of cementitious composite for heavyweight concrete preparation using conduction calorimetry",
  annote="The present work investigates the hydration heat of different cement composites by means of conduction calorimetry to optimize the composition of binder in the design of heavyweight concrete as biological shielding. For this purpose, Portland cement CEM I 42.5 R was replaced by a different portion of supplementary cementitious materials (blast furnace slag, metakaolin, silica fume/limestone) at 75%, 65%, 60%, 55%, and 50% levels to obtain low hydration heat lower than 250 j g(-1). All ingredients were analyzed by energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) and nuclear activation analysis (NAA) to assess the content of major elements and isotopes. A mixture of two high-density aggregates (barite and magnetite) was used to prepare three heavyweights concretes with compressive strength exceeding 45 MPa and bulk density ranging between 3400 and 3500 kg m(-3). After a short period of volume expansion (up to 4 h), a slight shrinkage (max. 0.3 degrees/degrees degrees) has been observed. Also, thermophysical properties (thermal conductivity, volumetric specific heat, thermal diffusivity) and other properties were determined. The results showed that aggregate content and not binder is the main factor influencing the engineering properties of heavyweight concretes.",
  address="SPRINGER",
  chapter="165064",
  doi="10.1007/s10973-020-09530-0",
  howpublished="online",
  institution="SPRINGER",
  number="1",
  volume="142",
  year="2020",
  month="september",
  pages="255--266",
  publisher="SPRINGER",
  type="journal article in Web of Science"
}